Word by Word

Practical insights for writers from Jessica P Morrell

Archive for the 'Jessica Page Morrell' Category

July, and…

The year is half over. People are shooting off fireworks on this Fourth eve. Such resonant booms on a full moon night. And quicker, higher explosions some distance away. More gunshotty types closer. It’s the Buck Moon, and it’s still  not risen above the firs. It’s also a super moon because of its proximity to […]

Read the rest of this entry »

Are your fiction characters frustrated?

FRUSTRATION CREATES STORY ~ Nancy Kress If you want to watch a film {make that rom-com} where frustration is woven into the storyline again and again, you can’t go wrong with When Harry Met Sally.   

Read the rest of this entry »

June

Read the rest of this entry »

The child raised on folklore…

Fairytales are more than moral lessons and time capsules for cultural commentary, they are natural law.  The child raised on folklore will quickly learn the rules of  crossroads and lakes, mirrors and mushroom rings. They’ll never eat or drink of a strange harvest or insult an old woman or fritter away their name as if […]

Read the rest of this entry »

From F. Scott Fitzgerald

Read the rest of this entry »

May

Read the rest of this entry »

April

Read the rest of this entry »

Read the rest of this entry »

Setting Details Catagorize

I’ve been sitting  in my armchair with my laptop and a cup of Earl Grey watching the sunrise decorate the horizon through Douglas firs. I know the colors I’m looking at have a scientific basis–when  the sun is low at sunrise and sunset, sunlight needs to travel farther through more of the atmoshphere than during […]

Read the rest of this entry »

Building Storyland, 2

Place matters. With your opening words the setting signals readers that they’ve now entered storyland. Signals readers that a story— part wonder, part participation located in an ordinary or treasured or troubled realm⎼⎼is unfolding. It means readers will have a place to  land and settle in. And setting helps categorize fiction–urbanfantasy, westerns,  Lovecraftian, dark fantasy, high […]

Read the rest of this entry »